On Writing, and the Four-Minute Mile

Roger Bannister, the first athlete to break the four-minute mile, said this about his record-breaking run: “The world seemed to stand still, or did not exist. The only reality was the next 200 yards of track under my feet. The tape meant finality–extinction perhaps. I felt at that moment that it was my chance to do one thing supremely well. I drove on, impelled by … Continue reading On Writing, and the Four-Minute Mile

On Writing: Hemingway on Writing, Ambition, the Art of Revision, from Abigayle Blood at Writer’s Blog

I’ve read some of Hemingway’s advice in other places, but this post pulls a lot of the best together. I was unaware of Arnold Samuelson and his connection to Papa; what a great story! Best of all, Hemingway shares his reading list for writers. Thanks to Abigayle Blood for the post. Enjoy! “As a writer you should not judge. You should understand,” Ernest Hemingway (July 21, 1899–July 2, 1961) counseled … Continue reading On Writing: Hemingway on Writing, Ambition, the Art of Revision, from Abigayle Blood at Writer’s Blog

On Writing: Who Lurks There? Friend or Foe? By Anna Dobritt

More great writing know-how from Anna Dobritt – Author! Who Lurks There? Friend or Foe? In another article, Getting to Know You, I covered the main character, your protagonist. Today I’m covering the bad guy. He or she is your antagonist. This person is responsible for making life difficult for your main character and the supporting characters. As you did with your main character, […] via … Continue reading On Writing: Who Lurks There? Friend or Foe? By Anna Dobritt

On Writing: What Makes Literary Fiction Literary? By Nathan Bransford

This article by Nathan Bransford describes the difference between Commercial, or Mainstream, Fiction and Literary Fiction. There are dozens of articles devoted to the differences between the main genres of fiction, but Nathan’s unique definition makes it clear enough to understand. I think a lot of writers believe “literary” means smarter or intellectual. Maybe so. It may be tempting for some writers to use the thesaurus … Continue reading On Writing: What Makes Literary Fiction Literary? By Nathan Bransford

On Writing: Elements of a Scene, by Samantha House

Excellent post! Excellent source of resource material for writers. Make sure you follow the link to Jami Gold’s website. Miss this, and miss the writing boat! Originally posted on Samantha House: For those of you who follow me on Instagram you’ll have seen that I’m editing again. This time around I’ve been using the Elements of a Scene Worksheet by Jami Gold and freaking hell has … Continue reading On Writing: Elements of a Scene, by Samantha House

On Writing: A Writer’s Perspective on Reading — by Anna Dobritt — Author

Reblogged from Anna Dobritt – Author   A Writer’s Perspective on Reading Yes, I am a writer. I love to write. I love making up stories about unusual pictures such as abandoned buildings, foggy forests, ravens, and writing prompts. I’m even learning to write short personal essays, which are hard for me. However, I am also a reader. If I could figure […] via A Writer’s Perspective … Continue reading On Writing: A Writer’s Perspective on Reading — by Anna Dobritt — Author

1984 Redux

1984 came and left; people wondered at the commotion. As it turned out, 1984 was only a prophecy of the brave new world to come, an inferno that we’re entering now. We wanted a republic, but we’ve built an animal farm ruled by self-righteous pickpockets in a world where the temperature creeps ever closer to Fahrenheit 451, a degree of oppression not yet witnessed in … Continue reading 1984 Redux